The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Intervention on Children’s Attention Regulation

Felver, J.C., Tipsord, J.M., Morris, M.J. Racer, K.H., & Dishion, T.J. (2014). The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Intervention on Children’s Attention Regulation. Journal of Attention Disorders August 29, 2014 1087054714548032.

Abstract: Objective: This article describes results from a randomized clinical trial of a mindfulness-based intervention for parents and children, Mindful Family Stress Reduction, on a behavioral measure of attention in youths, the Attention Network Task (ANT). Method: Forty-one parent–child dyads were randomly assigned to either the mindfulness-based intervention condition or a wait-list control. School-age youths completed the ANT before and after the intervention. Results: Results demonstrate significant, medium-size (f 2 = −.16) intervention effects to the conflict monitoring subsystem of the ANT such that those in the intervention condition decreased in conflict monitoring more than those in the wait-list control. Youths in the intervention condition also showed improvements in their orienting subsystem scores, compared with controls. Conclusion: Mindfulness-based interventions for youths have potential utility to improve attentional self-regulation, and future research should consider incorporating measures of attention into interventions that use mindfulness training.

Read the article: Felver, J.C., Tipsord, J.M., Morris, M.J. Racer, K.H., & Dishion, T.J. (2014). The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Intervention on Children’s Attention Regulation. Journal of Attention Disorders August 29, 2014 1087054714548032.

Photo courtesty of Shutterstock/maxim ibragimov.



(Something interesting I found)Posted:Aug 01 2014, 12:00 AM by brendah
  • jbnephew said:

    If anyone in this community knows of any research on mindfulness where the control is unstructured free time that creates space for reflection(such as a quaker circle, sitting with an open ended question, having some reflective books around to discuss) - i would love to see it. The classic good samaritan study shows how simply creating a sense of spaciousness is all that is required for more thoughtful action.


    November 28, 2014 11:48 AM
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