The Buddha's Radical Psychology: Explorations

The Buddha's Radical Psychology: Explorations

My newest book now available is titled, The Buddha's Radical Psychology: Explorations.The Buddha's teachings are, at heart, a way of life based on a revolutionary psychology which emphasizes the cultivation of wisdom and compassion. Through an exploration of significant, recent findings and thought in psychology, neuroscience, biology, physics, linguistics, ecology and culture, this book shows how the Buddha's teachings are at the cutting edge of the new direction that psychology must take to reflect and apply the latest trends in science. The focus of this book is on exploring the links between
Buddhist teachings and modern psychology in a mutually
illuminating way. Even though the Buddha taught over
2500 years ago, his insights are being supported by
the newest discoveries in psychology, biology and
other branches of science. Whilst Western mainstream
academia typically understands Buddhism as a religion
or a philosophy, the teachings of the Buddha are not in
fact, a religious doctrine (religion defined as the belief in
or the worship of a god or gods). The Buddha did not
endorse a god or external agency that interfered in the
lives of living beings, nor did he encourage or endorse the
metaphysically sacred or divine. Throughout his teachings,
the Buddha attributed all of humankind’s attainments,
achievements, and foibles to human effort and human
understanding, or the lack thereof. He established a
method of ethical and psychological training that leads to psychological freedom of the mind.


This book explores how the Buddha’s teachings offer to the world of psychology and psychotherapy significant and groundbreaking (yet not totally unfamiliar) perspectives and solutions to many of the most pressing psychological and social difficulties in the human condition. Although the Buddha never completed a scientific theory of personality (he wasn’t a scientist) there are striking similarities, as well as several significant underlying differences, between modern Western psychology’s analysis of a human being’s personality and the early Buddhist view. In fact, the Buddha’s teachings and original suttas are best understood as a sophisticated psychological doctrine with very rich psychological concepts. Even as the Buddha’s teachings have become better known and analyzed in Western societies, many academic psychologists still generally perceive the Buddha’s fundamental teachings as being irrelevant or inappropriate as a study in psychology. Nevertheless, in the past 50 years some attempts have been made to bridge and integrate clinical psychology, such as psychoanalysis and other schools of psychotherapy, with Buddhism. These attempts, however, have viewed Buddhism through the lens of Western psychology, with much of the significance of the Buddha’s original and radical message having been lost or obscured as a consequence. Therefore, it is not my intent here to use Western psychological and biological concepts to assimilate the Buddha’s original perspective into an already preconceived Western psychological theory, but to illuminate both, and thereby enhance the understanding of each. The Buddha’s teachings are profound, unique and revolutionary in their understanding of human psychology, and have in many ways foreshadowed modern psychology – this book endeavors to explore these connections.







(My publication)Posted:Apr 30 2016, 05:00 PM by rodger ricketts
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