Wisdom and Bias: Towards State-Focused Measurement of Wisdom-Related Cognition

Brienza, B, Kung, F. Y. H., Santos, H. C., Bobocel, D., & Grossmann, I. (2017, February 28). Wisdom and bias: Towards state-focused measurement of wisdom-related cognition. Retrieved from osf.io/preprints/psyarxiv/p25c2

Abstract: Philosophers and behavioral scientists refer to wisdom as unbiased reasoning that guides one toward a good and virtuous life. However, major instruments developed to test wisdom are by default influenced by psychological bias. We examined whether shifting the focus from global, de-contextualized reports to state-focused reports about concrete situations provides a less biased method to assess wise thinking (e.g., intellectual humility, recognition of uncertainty and change, consideration of the broader context at hand and perspectives of others, integration of these perspectives/compromise). To this end, we introduce a state-focused measure of wise thinking. Results of a large-scale psychometric investigation (N = 3,982) revealed that the new measure is reliable and is not subject to psychological biases (attribution bias, bias blind spot, self-deception, impression management), whereas global wisdom reports are subject to such biases. Moreover, state-focused scores were positively related to indices of living well (e.g., adaptive emotion regulation, mindfulness) and to prosocial behavior. We discuss theoretical and practical implications for research on wisdom, judgment and decision making, well-being, and prosociality.

Read the article: Brienza, B, Kung, F. Y. H., Santos, H. C., Bobocel, D., & Grossmann, I. (2017, February 28). Wisdom and bias: Towards state-focused measurement of wisdom-related cognition. Retrieved from osf.io/preprints/psyarxiv/p25c2



(Something interesting I found)Posted:Feb 01 2017, 12:00 AM by jlmatelski
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