Strengths of Character and Virtues: What We Know and What We Still Want to Learn

Park, Barton, & Pillay. (2017). Strengths of character and virtues: What we know and what we still want to learn. In M. A. Warren & S. I Donaldson [Eds.]. Scientific Advances in Positive Psychology (pp. 73-87).Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.

Chapter excerpt: The new field of positive psychology has refocused scientific attention on character, unabashedly calling it one of the pillars of this new field and central to the understanding of the psychological good life (Seligman & Csikszenmihalyi, 2000). Among the pillars of positive psychology, character may occupy the most central role. In their introduction to positive psychology, Seligman and Csikszenmihalyi (2000) described the study of positive traits (e.g. character) as a central pillar of this new field, and Park and Peterson (2003) proposed that character links together the other central topics of positive psychology: positive experiences, positive social relationships, and positive intitutions. Thus, positive experiences like pleasure and flow (Csikszenmihalyi, 1990) and close relationships with others is enabled by good character. Postive institutions like families, schools, and communities make it easier or harder for individuals to have and display good character, but these institutions are only positive in the first place when composed of people with good character. What is good character, and how can we measure it?

Read the chapter: Park, Barton, & Pillay. (2017). Strengths of character and virtues: What we know and what we still want to learn. In M. A. Warren & S. I Donaldson [Eds.]. Scientific Advances in Positive Psychology (pp. 73-87).Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.



(Something interesting I found)Posted:May 01 2017, 12:00 AM by jlmatelski
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