Wisdom across the ages and its modern day relevance

Mitchell, L. K., Knight, B. G., & Pachana, N. A. (2017). Wisdom across the ages and its modern day relevance. International Psychogeriatrics, 1-4.

Abstract: Wisdom is derived (in modern language terms) from the Old English words wis (“of a certainty, for certain”; “Wisdom,” 2015) and dóm (“statute, judgment, jurisdiction”; “Wisdom,” 2015); wisdom is, at its broadest, defined as the “Capacity of judging rightly in matters relating to life and conduct; soundness of judgement in the choice of means and ends; sometimes less strictly, sound sense, esp. in practical affairs” (“Wisdom,” 2015). As a concept, wisdom has been acknowledged within our history since the time of the Sumerians (and estimated to have originated in around 2,500 BCE). However, in modern times, the relevance of the traditional wise person is less clear. Nonetheless, wisdom research has been on the rise since it emerged as a focus of researchers in the 1970’s, and a part of that research focus has been to explore the significance of wisdom and its relevance in the current day (particularly with regards to how it is measured across cultures).

Read the article: Mitchell, L. K., Knight, B. G., & Pachana, N. A. (2017). Wisdom across the ages and its modern day relevance. International Psychogeriatrics, 1-4.



(Something interesting I found)Posted:May 01 2017, 12:00 AM by jlmatelski
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