Social class and wise reasoning style across regions, persons and situations

Brienza, J. P. & Grossmann, I. (2017). Social class and wise reasoning style across regions, persons and situations. Open Science Framework.

Abstract: For more than a century, scientists have examined the effects of social class on cognitive performance, concluding that higher class provides the ecological affordances to improve abstract cognition. Some research also suggests that higher class ecologies diminish prosociality. The latter findings led to a debate about replicability, and the cognitive processes that underlie class effects on prosociality. In the current article, we focus on one such process – wisdom- related reasoning. Drawing on advances in evolutionary and ecological theories, we propose that status is inversely related to a propensity of utilizing wise reasoning, contrary to established class advantage in abstract cognition. We tested this proposition in the first large-scale study of status effects on wise reasoning (N = 2,145), observing that higher social class consistently related to lower levels of wise reasoning across different levels of analysis, including regional and individual differences, and subjective construal of specific situations. These findings suggest that, in contrast to the affordances higher class may provide for abstract cognition, class may also weigh individuals down by providing the ecological constraints that undermine wise reasoning.

Read the article: Brienza, J. P. & Grossmann, I. (2017). Social class and wise reasoning style across regions, persons and situations. Open Science Framework. Retrieved from https://osf.io/wkgvm/download?format=pdf



(Something interesting I found)Posted:Jul 01 2017, 12:00 AM by jlmatelski
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