Development of Relational Wisdom and Happiness in Late Adulthood

Takahashi, M. (2017). Development of relational wisdom and happiness in late adulthood. In A. S. Dick & U. Muller [Eds.] Advancing Developmental Science: Philosophy, Theory, and Method (pp. 199-208). New York, NY: Routledge.

Excerpt: The field of adult development and aging has focused primarily on the issue of well-being of the older adult (Lamb & Freund, 2010; Overton, 2010). Two central issues related to well-being are wisdom and happiness. It is generally assumes that wisdom and happiness increase with age, but this assumption still warrants further examination. For example, while several studies in the U.S. support this relationship (e.g. Ardelt, 1997, 2004), data in Japan, the "grayest" country in the world, reveal a different pattern. These studies suggest that happiness declines with age (Frey & Stutzer, 2001). This chapter reviews the meaning, history, and cultural variability of these central concepts as well as recent empirical work that contributes to understanding the well-being of older adults.

Read the chapter: Takahashi, M. (2017). Development of relational wisdom and happiness in late adulthood. In A. S. *** & U. Muller [Eds.] Advancing Developmental Science: Philosophy, Theory, and Method (pp. 199-208). New York, NY: Routledge.



(Something interesting I found)Posted:Aug 01 2017, 12:00 AM by jlmatelski
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