Pursuing practice mindfulness and wisdom

Higgs, J., & Tasker, D. (2017). Pursuing Practice Mindfulness and Wisdom. In D. Tasker, J. Higgs, & S. Loftus [Eds.] Community-Based Healthcare (pp. 187-196). Rotterdam, Netherlands: Springer.

Chapter excerpt: Words like mindfulness and wisdom with their connotations of gentleness and obscure or ephemeral ways of thinking and acting are often discarded or rejected in this age of science-driven evidence for practice and accountability, and in a world where chaos-fluidity and technological communication rule supreme. We hear people talking disparagingly of being “thinky-feely”, using “old wives’ tales” and (ultimately) being unscientific, to describe actions like mindfulness and practice wisdom. These denigrations demonstrate lack of recognition of the substantive discourse on the nature and value of practice wisdom and experienced-based knowledge (see Kűpers & Pauleen, 2013; Sternberg, 1990) and the genuine purposes and actions underpinning mindful people-centred practices (see Mansell & Beadle-Brown, 2004; McCormack et al., 2010). A number of writers have drawn these two ideas together. Boyle and Roan (2013) explored “wise women or caring women: The paradoxical nature of the representation of women in management” and Mearns and Thorne (2000) discussed new frontiers in theory and practice of person-centred therapy, considering deeper issues of such practice in terms of personal commitment and professional credibility.

Buy the book: Higgs, J., & Tasker, D. (2017). Pursuing practice mindfulness and wisdom. In D. Tasker, J. Higgs, & S. Loftus [Eds.] Community-Based Healthcare (pp. 187-196). Rotterdam, Netherlands: Springer.



(Something interesting I found)Posted:Mar 01 2017, 12:00 AM by jlmatelski
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