Discussions
Are we ready for wisdom in health care?
By Margaret Plews-Ogan, MD, MS and Gene Beyt, MD, MS It seems that there could not be a better place for wisdom to take hold than in health care. What profession is more in need of making wise choices than one trusted with people’s lives? What organizations

  • COMMENTS
  • Fri, Apr 4 2014 11:11 AM

    Brenda Huskey

    By Margaret Plews-Ogan, MD, MS and Gene Beyt, MD, MS It seems that there could not be a better place for wisdom to take hold than in health care. What profession is more in need of making wise choices than one trusted with people’s lives? What organizations
  • Wed, Apr 9 2014 2:30 PM

    Brad Stephan

    I wonder if the fundamental question is not: "Are Wisdom and Capitalism compatible?"
  • Wed, Apr 9 2014 2:42 PM

    Harvey Sarles

    Almost ready. As the aging population is increasing rapidly, the question of wisdom of both patient and physicians is rising. Medicine is much more oriented toward "cures" - rather than with the questions of aging. Medicine has generally adopted
  • Wed, Apr 9 2014 4:38 PM

    margaret plews-ogan

    great comments! i believe that health care should be a public good, with universal access. It makes it easier to focus on the common good, and on the deeper meaning of the work Speaking of meaning, I agree Professor Sarles, that we have an enormous opportunity
  • Thu, Apr 10 2014 8:22 AM

    Michael Gillick

    Let us assume, for the moment, that wisdom is appropriately defined as right reason in the distribution of limited assets over a multiplicity of valid claims, and let us, for the moment, leave aside what "right" means in that definition. Regardless
  • Fri, Apr 18 2014 5:40 PM

    Gene Beyt

    Dr. Gillick’s comments are cogent and important. Health care leaders should lead from “our fundamental obligation to others.” As substantiated in the references below, this calls to mind the need for leaders to practice “humble inquiry” using patience
  • Mon, Apr 21 2014 8:52 PM

    edgar schein

    As I have argued in my recent book "Humble Inquiry: The gentle art of asking instead of telling" one of the most important aspects of wisdom is to know your own limitations and to know when you are in fact dependent on someone else, a common