A. J. Stasic


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The University of Chicago

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Recent Publications
How the Opinion of Others Affects Our Valuation of Objects
Current Biology Current Biology 20, 1–6, July 13, 2010 By Daniel K. Campbell-Meiklejohn, Dominik R. Bach, Andreas Roepstorff, Raymond J. Dolan1 and Chris D. Frith "The opinions of others can easily affect how much we value things. We investigated what happens in our brain when we agree with others about...
Intellectual enrichment lessens the effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in multiple sclerosis
NEUROLOGY 2010;74:1942-1945 By James F. Sumowski, Glenn R. Wylie, DPhil, Nancy Chiaravalloti, and John DeLuca "Learning and memory impairments are prevalent among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, such deficits are only weakly associated with MS disease severity...
Predicting Persuasion-Induced Behavior Change from the Brain
The Journal of Neuroscience 30: 8421-8424 By Emily B. Falk, Elliot T. Berkman, Traci Mann, Brittany Harrison, and Matthew D. Lieberman "Although persuasive messages often alter people's self-reported attitudes and intentions to perform behaviors, these self-reports do not necessarily...
Information Without Truth
Metaphilosophy Volume 41 Issue 3, Pages 313 - 330 BY ANDREA SCARANTINO AND GUALTIERO PICCININI "According to the Veridicality Thesis, information requires truth. On this view, smoke carries information about there being a fire only if there is a fire, the proposition that the earth has two moons...
Facilitating Client Change: Principles Based Upon the Experience of Eminent Psychotherapists
Psychotherapy Research; May 2010, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p337-352, 16p By Heidi M. Levitt and Daniel Williams "Eminent therapists across psychotherapy meta-orientations were asked to describe the processes by which they facilitate change in psychotherapy. A grounded theory analysis of these interviews was conducted...
Incidental Haptic Sensations Influence Social Judgments and Decisions
Science 25 June 2010: Vol. 328. no. 5986, pp. 1712 - 1715 By Joshua M. Ackerman, Christopher C. Nocera, John A. Bargh "Touch is both the first sense to develop and a critical means of information acquisition and environmental manipulation. Physical touch experiences may create an ontological scaffold for...
Neural Correlates of the "Aha" Experiences: Evidence From an fMRI Study of Insight Problem Solving
Cortex Volume 46, Issue 3, March 2010, Pages 397-403 By Qiu J, Li H, Jou J, Liu J, Luo Y, Feng T, and Wu Z, Zhang Q. "In the present study, we used learning-testing paradigm to examine brain activation of "Aha" effects with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during...
Investigating the Role of Two Types of Understanding in Relationship Well-Being: Understanding Is More Important Than Knowledge
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 35, No. 11, pg. 1512-1527. By: Monique M. H. Pollman and Catrin Finkenauer Understanding is at the heart of intimate relationships. It is unclear, however, whether understanding—partners’ subjective feeling that they understand each other—or knowledge—partners’ accurate knowledge...
Emotions as Within or Between People? Cultural Variation in Lay Theories of Emotion Expression and Inference
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 35, No. 11, 1427-1439. By Yukiko Uchida, Sarah S. M. Townsend, Hazel Rose Markus, and Hilary B. Bergsieker Four studies using open-ended and experimental methods test the hypothesis that in Japanese contexts, emotions are understood as between people, whereas in American contexts...
Individuals, groups, fitness and utility: multi-level selection meets social choice theory
Biology and Philosophy Volume 24, Number 5, pg. 561-584. By Samir Okasha In models of multi-level selection, the property of Darwinian fitness is attributed to entities at more than one level of the biological hierarchy, e.g. individuals and groups. However, the relation between individual and group fitness...
The long reach of philosophy of biology
Biology and Philosophy, DOI 10.1007/s10539-009-9185-7. A review of Michael Ruse's book by Matt Gers. The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Biology covers a broad range of topics in this field. It is not just a textbook focusing on evolutionary theory but encompasses ethics, social science and behaviour...
Autonomy, Experience, and Reflection. On a Neglected Aspect of Personal Autonomy
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice. ISSN 1572-8447 By Claudia Blöser, Aron Schöpf and Marcus Willaschek The aim of this paper is to suggest that a necessary condition of autonomy has not been sufficiently recognized in the literature: the capacity to critically reflect on one’s practical attitudes (desires...
The Validity of a New, Self-report Measure of Multiple Intelligence
Current Psychology. ISSN 1936-4733 By Adrian Furnham In all, 187 participants completed a new, self-report measure of eight multiple intelligences (Haselbauer 2005), a General Knowledge test (Irwing et al. Personality and Individual Differences 30:857–871, 2001), a measure of Approaches...
"Fighting with Proverbs": Kasena Women's (Re)Definition of Female Personhood through Proverbial Jesting
Research in African Literatures, Volume 40, Number 3, Fall 2009, pp. 74-95 By Helen Yitah This study is an attempt to document and critically explore what I term the "proverbial revolt" of Kasena women from northern Ghana. The women take advantage of a socially sanctioned medium, the joking relationship that exists...
The effects of insula damage on decision-making for risky gains and losses
Social Neuroscience, Volume 4, Issue 4 August 2009 , pages 347 - 358 By Joshua A. Weller; Irwin P. Levin; Baba Shiv; Antoine Bechara Several lines of functional neuroimaging studies have attributed a role for the insula, a critical component of the brain's emotional circuitry, in risky decision-making. However, very...
Fairness as Appropriateness
Science, Technology & Human Values, Vol. 34, No. 5, 573-606 By Grégoire Mallard, Michèle Lamont, Joshua Guetzkow Epistemological differences fuel continuous and frequently divisive debates in the social sciences and the humanities. Sociologists have yet to consider how such differences affect peer evaluation....
Empathic forecasting: How do we predict other people's feelings?
Cognition and Emotion - 2009 - volume 23 - issue 5 - first page 978 By Pollmann, Monique; Finkenauer, Catrin When making affective forecasts, people commit the impact bias. They overestimate the impact an emotional event has on their affective experience. In three studies we show that people also commit the impact bias...
The Romance of Learning from Disagreement. The Effect of Cohesiveness and Disagreement on Knowledge Sharing Behavior and Individual Performance Within Teams
Journal of Business and Psychology By Marianne van Woerkom and Karin Sanders | Journal of Business and Psychology ' Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of disagreement and cohesiveness on knowledge sharing in teams, and on the performance of individual team...
A Process Model of Organizational Change in Cultural Context (OC3 Model)
Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Vol. 16, No. 1, 19-37 (2009) By Gail F. Latta Change resides at the heart of leadership. Organizational culture is one of many situational variables that have emerged as pivotal in determining the success of leaders' efforts to implement change initiatives. This article introduces...
Evolution and Emergence: Systems, Organizations, Persons
Religious Studies Review Volume 35, Issue 3, Pages 153-153 By Amos Yong | Religious Studies Review "This volume extends the conversation opened up by the series of volumes produced by the jointly sponsored Vatican Observatory and the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences (Berkeley, CA) ventures and...
The Crystallization of Contemporary Racial Prejudice across the Lifespan
Political Psychology, Volume 30, Number 4, August 2009 , pp. 569-590(22) By P. J. Henry and David O Sears 'The conventional wisdom is that racial prejudice remains largely stable through adulthood. However, very little is known about the development of contemporary racial attitudes like symbolic racism. The growing crystallization...
Thinking about Language
CURRENT ANTHROPOLOGY Volume 50, Number 4 By Robin Dunbar. "Just what makes the difference between apes (and especially chimpanzees) and humans has remained one of the perennial questions that has bedeviled much of the debate in comparative psychology, as well as primatology and anthropology...
The Developmental Etiology of High IQ
Behavior Genetics, Volume 39, Number, 1573-3297. By Angela M. Brant and et al. "The genetic and environmental trends in IQ development were assessed in 483 same-sex twin pairs in the Colorado longitudinal twin study using maximum-likelihood model-fitting analysis. The twins were assessed periodically...
Pushing moral buttons: The interaction between personal force and intention in moral judgment
Cognition, Volume 111, Issue 3, Pages 364-371. By Joshua D. Greene, et al. (Joshua Green is a wisdom grantee). In some cases people judge it morally acceptable to sacrifice one person’s life in order to save several other lives, while in other similar cases they make the opposite judgment. Researchers...
Social Science & Human Flourishing: The Scottish Enlightenment & Today
Journal of Scottish Philosophy By Ryan P. Hanley, a wisdom grantee. The Scottish Enlightenment is commonly identified as the birthplace of modern social science. But while Scottish and contemporary social science share a commitment to empiricism, contemporary insistence on the separation...
The Role of Self-Compassion in Development: A Healthier Way to Relate to Oneself
Human Development, 2009;52:211–214. By Kristin D. Neff The idea that people need high self-esteem in order to be psychologically healthy is almost a truism in Western developmental psychology. Parents are told that one of their most important tasks is to nurture their children’s self-esteem...
Rapid evolution of social learning
Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Volume 22 Issue 9, pg 1914 - 1922. By M. FRANZ & C. L. NUNN "Culture is widely thought to be beneficial when social learning is less costly than individual learning and thus may explain the enormous ecological success of humans. Rogers (1988. Does biology constrain culture. Am...
The social brain hypothesis and its implications for social evolution
Annals of Human Biology, Volume 36, Issue 5, pg 562 - 572. By R. I. M. Dunbar "The social brain hypothesis was proposed as an explanation for the fact that primates have unusually large brains for body size compared to all other vertebrates: Primates evolved large brains to manage their unusually complex...
Mindfulness and Psychotherapy
Religious Studies Review. Volume 35, Issue 3, Pages 151-152 By Ann Gleig "This edited collection provides a useful and clear overview of the increasing adoption of mindfulness practice by psychotherapeutic and medical communities. Defining mindfulness as the "awareness of present experience with acceptance...
Language, thought, and color: Whorf was half right
Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Volume 13, Issue 10, 439-446, 28 August 2009 By Terry Regier and Paul Kay "The Whorf hypothesis holds that we view the world filtered through the semantic categories of our native language. Over the years, consensus has oscillated between embrace and dismissal of this hypothesis. Here, we review...
Neuroscience: Knowledge rewards
Nature "Monkeys like to know the size of rewards coming their way, and, in the brain, this desire is signalled by the same dopamine neurons that signal primitive rewards like sex and food. Ethan Bromberg-Martin and Okihide Hikosaka of the National Eye Institute...
Task-dependent organization of brain regions active during rest
PNAS June 30, 2009 vol. 106 no. 26 10841-10846. By Howard C. Nusbaum, et al. "The human brain demonstrates complex yet systematic patterns of neural activity at rest. We examined whether functional connectivity among those brain regions typically active during rest depends on ongoing and recent...
What role does commitment play among writers with different levels of creativity?
Creativity Research Journal By Seana Moran, a wisdom grantee. "Commitment involves how a person invests resources in a work role over long periods of time. Creativity is a novel, appropriate variation that is embraced by a field of gatekeepers and transforms the symbolic domain...
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Institution

The University of Chicago

Current Position

Webmaster/Office Assistant

Highest Degree

M.S. Bacteriology

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