Nicholas Stock


undergrad student

University of Chicago

Send Email Send Email

Sorry, no bio is available



Recent Publications
From Moral to Legal Judgment: The Influence of Normative Context in Lawyers and other Academics
Social Cognitive and Effective Neuroscience, DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsq010, 2010. Stephan Schleim , Tade M. Spranger , Susanne Erk, Henrik Walter Various kinds of normative judgments are an integral part of everyday life. We extended the scrutiny of social cognitive neuroscience into the domain of legal decisions, investigating two...
Wisdom: From Philosophy to Neuroscience
From Philosophy to Neuroscience. New York: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2010. Stephen S. Hall "A compelling investigation into one of our most coveted and cherished ideals, and the efforts of modern science to penetrate the mysterious nature of this timeless virtue. We all recognize wisdom, but defining it is more elusive...
Daniel Kahneman: The Riddle of Experience vs. Memory
TED2010, filmed February 2010; Posted March 2010 From TED "Using examples from vacations to colonoscopies, Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman reveals how our "experiencing selves" and our "remembering selves" perceive happiness differently. This...
Going Green to be Seen: Status, Reputation, and Conspicuous Conservation
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 98, No. 3, pg. 392-404, 2010. Vladas Griskevicius, Joshua M. Tybur, Bram Van den Bergh Why do people purchase proenvironmental “green” products? We argue that buying such products can be construed as altruistic, since green products often cost more and are of lower quality than their...
Debate: To Nudge or Not to Nudge
Journal of Political Philosophy Journal of Political Philosophy, Vol. 18, No. 1, Pg. 123-136, 2010. Daniel M. Hausman and Brynn Welch One of the hottest ideas in current policy debates is “libertarian paternalism,” the design of policies that push individuals toward better choices without limiting their liberty. In their recent book, Nudge, Richard...
Neural Evidence for Inequality-averse Social Preferences
Nature, No. 463, pg. 1089-1091, 2010. Elizabeth Tricomi, Antonio Rangel, Colin F. Camerer, John P. O’Doherty A popular hypothesis in the social sciences is that humans have social preferences to reduce inequality in outcome distributions because it has a negative impact on their experienced...
Crossing the Interdisciplinary Divide: Political Science and Biological Science
Political Studies, Vol. 58, No. 2, Pg. 320-339, 2010. Justin Greaves, Wyn Grant This article argues that interdisciplinary collaboration can offer significant intellectual gains to political science in terms of methodological insights, questioning received assumptions and providing new perspectives on subject...
The Role of Therapist Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy: A Qualitative Review.
Clinical Psychology Review, Vol. 30, pg. 63-77, Jennifer R. Henretty, Heidi M. Levitt Over 90% of therapists self-disclose to clients (Mathews, 1989; Pope, Tabachnick, & Keith-Spiegel, 1987; Edwards & Murdock, 1994), however, the implications of therapist self-disclosure are unclear, with highly...
Challenging Certainty: The Utility and History of Counterfactualism
History and Theory, Vol. 49, No. 1, Pg. 38-57, 2010. Simon T. Kaye Counterfactualism is a useful process for historians as a thought-experiment because it offers grounds to challenge an unfortunate contemporary historical mindset of assumed, deterministic certainty. This article suggests that the methodological...
Embodied Cognition and Mindreading
Mind & Language, Vol. 25, No. 1, Pg. 119-140, 2010. Shannon Spaulding Recently, philosophers and psychologists defending the embodied cognition research program have offered arguments against mindreading as a general model of our social understanding. The embodied cognition arguments are of two kinds:...
A Social-Cognitive Framework of Multidisciplinary Team Innovation
Topics in Cognitive Science, Vol. 2, No. 1, Pg. 73-95, 2010. Susannah B. F. Paletz , Christian D. Schunn The psychology of science typically lacks integration between cognitive and social variables. We present a new framework of team innovation in multidisciplinary science and engineering groups that ties factors...
Evolving the Capacity to Understand Actions, Intentions, and Goals
Annual Review of Psychology, Vol. 61, pg. 303-324, 2010. Marc Hauser and Justin Wood We synthesize the contrasting predictions of motor simulation and teleological theories of action comprehension and present evidence from a series of studies showing that monkeys and apes—like humans—extract the meaning of...
The Freedom of Desire: Hegel's Response to Rousseau on the Problem of Civil Society
American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 54, No. 1, Pg. 125-139, 2010. Jeffrey Church The ever-growing body of literature on civil society can benefit from a return to the original theoretical articulation and defense of the concept in the work of G.W.F. Hegel. Specifically, this article suggests that Jean-Jacques Rousseau's...
Good and Good For You: An Affect Theory of Happiness
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 80, No. 1, pg. 133-163, 2010. Laura Sizer Happiness is something we all want and strive for. But what is it and why do we want it so badly? Philosophers have offered two sorts of answers to the first question, identifying happiness either with a psychological state or condition (a...
Comparing the Neural Basis of Monetary Reward and Cognitive Feedback during Information-Integration Category Learning
The Journal of Neuroscience,Vol. 30, No. 1, pg. 47–55, 2010. Reka Daniel and Stefan Pollmann The dopaminergic system is known to play a central role in reward-based learning (Schultz, 2006), yet it was also observed to be involved when only cognitive feedback is given (Aron et al., 2004). Within the domain of information...
A Distraction Can Impair or Enhance Motor Performance
The Journal of Neuroscience,Vol. 30, No. 2, pg. 650-654, 2010. Christopher Hemond, Rachel M. Brown, Edwin M. Robertson Humans have a prodigious capacity to perform multiple tasks simultaneously. Being distracted while, for example, performing a complex motor skill adds complexity to a task and thus leads to a performance...
Cognitive Management in an Enduring National Rivalry: The Case of India and Pakistan
Political Psychology, Vol. 30, No. 6, Pg. 937-951. Peter Suedfeld, Rajiv Jhangiani Using integrative complexity scoring, the current study addresses how communications by leaders of India and Pakistan have revealed their information processing and decision-making strategies. The hostility between India...
Parents and peers as providers of support in adolescents' social network: a developmental perspective
Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 38, No. 1, Pg. 16-27. Jorge F. del Valle, Amaia Bravo, Mónica López The authors carried out an assessment of social support networks with a sample of 884 Spanish adolescents aged 12 to 17. The main goal was to analyze the development of the figures of parents and peers as...
Dynamic Cultural Influences on Neural Representations of the Self
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 22, No. 1, pg. 1-11. Joan Y. Chiao , Tokiko Harada , Hidetsugu Komeda , Zhang Li , Yoko Mano , Daisuke Saito , Todd B. Parrish , Norihiro Sadato and Tetsuya Iidaka People living in multicultural environments often encounter situations which require them to acquire different...
Democracy and Judicial Review: Are They Really Incompatible?
Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 7, No. 4, pg. 805-822. Annabelle Lever This article shows that judicial review has a democratic justification, although it is not necessary for democratic government and its virtues are controversial and often speculative. Against critics like Waldron and Bellamy, it shows...
Nameless + harmless = blameless: When seemingly irrelevant factors influence judgment of (un)ethical behavior
DOI: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2009.11.001 Francesca Gino, Lisa L. Shu and Max H. Bazerman People often make judgments about the ethicality of others’ behaviors and then decide how harshly to punish such behaviors. When they make these judgments and decisions, sometimes the victims of the unethical...
The Problem of Single-Party Predominance in an Unconsolidated Democracy: The Example of Argentina
Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 7, No. 4, pg. 767-784. Leslie E. Anderson Parties can be a crucial to democratic function but not all parties or party systems are democratic. Some parties are fully competitive within a pluralist system while others, notably hegemonic parties, are antithetical to democracy...
What Is Political Psychology?
Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 7, No. 4, pg. 859-882. Kristen Renwick Monroea, William Chiua, Adam Martina and Bridgette Portman We contribute to a greater understanding of political psychology by 1) collecting data in a more systematic way for the intellectual community, 2) sensitizing students to the extent...
Unconscious Learning versus Visual Perception: Dissociable Roles for Gamma Oscillations Revealed in MEG
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 21, No. 12, Pg. 2287-2299. Maximilien Chaumon , Denis Schwartz and Catherine Tallon-Baudry Oscillatory synchrony in the gamma band (30–120 Hz) has been involved in various cognitive functions including conscious perception and learning. Explicit memory encoding, in particular,...
The ‘return to community’
Journal of Sociology, Vol. 45, No. 4, 433-444. Barbara Fawcett, Maurice Hanlon In Australia and the United Kingdom over the past two decades, the way human service professionals have been involved in ‘communities’, whether defined by ‘place’, ‘interest’ or ‘exclusion’, has varied with the political...
A Social Representations Approach To The Communication Between Different Spheres: An Analysis Of The Impacts Of Two Discursive Formats
Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, Vol. 39, No. 4, Pg. 415 - 433. Susana Batel and Paula Castro This paper discusses the potential of the notions of reification and consensualization as developed by the theory of social representations as analytical tools for addressing the communication between the lay and scientific...
Measuring the Quality of Life in the U.S.: Political Reflections
Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 7, No. 4, pg. . Jacob Hacker A review of The Measure of America: American Human Development Report, 2008-2009 , by Sarah Burd-Sharps, Kristen Lewis, and Eduardo Borges Martins. Reports from abroad on the American condition have a special place in the canon of social...
A Longitudinal Test of the Model of Political Conservatism as Motivated Social Cognition
Political Psychology, Vol. 30, No. 6, Pg. 921-936. Miriam Matthews , Shana Levin , Jim Sidanius Using data from a longitudinal study of college students, this study assessed the relationships among the threat perceptions of realistic threat and intergroup anxiety, the ideological motives of system justification...
Distinguishing the Power of Agency from Agentic Power: A Note on Weber and the "Black Box" of Personal Agency
Sociological Theory, Vol. 27, No. 4, Pg. 407-418. Colin Campbell The concept of agency, although central to many sociological debates, has remained frustratingly elusive to pin down. This article is an attempt to open up what has been called the "black box" of personal agency by distinguishing...
Does Habitus Matter? A Comparative Review of Bourdieu's Habitus and Simon's Bounded Rationality with Some Implications for Economic Sociology
Sociological Theory, Vol. 27, No. 4, Pg. 419-434. Francois Collet In this article, I revisit Pierre Bourdieu's concept of habitus and contrast it with Herbert Simon's notion of bounded rationality. Through a discussion of the literature of economic sociology on status and Fligstein's political...
Purpose: giftedness in intrapersonal intelligence.
High Ability Studies, Vol. 20, No. 2, pg. 143-159. Seana Moran Purpose is an internal compass that integrates engagement in activities that affect others, self-awareness of one's reasons, and the intention to continue these activities. We argue that purpose represents giftedness in intrapersonal intelligence...
Automatic Evaluation
Current Directions in Psychological Science, Vol. 18, No. 6, pg. 362-366. Melissa J. Ferguson and Vivian Zayas Humans continuously evaluate aspects of their environment (people, objects, places) in an automatic fashion (i.e., unintentionally, rapidly). Such evaluations can be highly adaptive, triggering behavioral responses...
The Process of Personal Change Through Reading Fictional Narratives: Implications for Psychotherapy Practice and Theory.
Humanistic Psychologist, Vol. 37, No. 4, pg. 326-352. Heidi M. Levitt, Woraporn Rattanasampan, Sean Suwichit, Caroline Stanley, Tamara Robinson This qualitative study provides an understanding of how and when individuals experience transformational change as a consequence of reading narratives. Six participants...
Restricted and Elaborated Modes in the Cultural Analysis of Politics
Sociological Forum, Vol. 24, No. 4, Pg. 926-934. Brian Steensland The "cultural turn" that swept across the social sciences a generation ago ushered in renewed attention to the cultural analysis of politics. Yet despite this growing area of research, there remains a lack of integration between...
Public Intellectuality: Academies of Exhibition and the New Disciplinary Secession
Theory & Event, Vol. 12, No. 4. Patricia Mooney Nickel Painting in fin-de-siècle Vienna, like public intellectuality in fin-de-siècle America, was an act of portrayal at a time when artists then, like intellectuals today, composed in an environment characterized by rapid technological...
Contextualized self: When the self runs into social dilemmas
International Journal of Psychology, Vol. 44, No. 6, pg. 451-458, 2009. Chang-Jiang Liu, Shu Li Research on the construction of self and of others has indicated that the way that individuals construe themselves and others exerts an important influence on their cognition, emotion, and even behavior. The present study extends...
The Evolution of Misbelief
Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 6, pg. 493-510, 2009. Ryan T. McKay, Daniel C. Dennett From an evolutionary standpoint, a default presumption is that true beliefs are adaptive and misbeliefs maladaptive. But if humans are biologically engineered to appraise the world accurately and to form true beliefs,...
Non-instrumental belief is largely founded on singularity
Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 6, pg. 511-512, 2009. George Ainslie The radical evolutionary step that divides human decision-making from that of nonhumans is the ability to excite the reward process for its own sake, in imagination. Combined with hyperbolic over-valuation of the present, this ability is...
Extending the range of adaptive misbelief: Memory “distortions” as functional features
Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 6, pg. 513-514, 2009. Pascal Boyer A large amount of research in cognitive psychology is focused on memory distortions, understood as deviations from various (largely implicit) standards. Many alleged distortions actually suggest a highly functional system that balances the...
Philosophical Pitfalls: The Methods Debate in American Political Science
Journal of Integrated Social Sciences, Vol. 1, No. 1, pg. 141-176, 2009. Nivien Saleh Positivism dominates research in U.S. political science. I will show that even though critical realism is virtually unknown in the discipline, realist concepts have found their way into debates among qualitative methodologists. The analysis...
Cortex and Memory: Emergence of a New Paradigm
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 21, No. 11, Pages 2047-2072. Joaquín M. Fuster Converging evidence from humans and nonhuman primates is obliging us to abandon conventional models in favor of a radically different, distributed-network paradigm of cortical memory. Central to the new paradigm is the concept of memory...
The Role of Peer Social Capital in Educational Assimilation of Immigrant Youths
Sociological Inquiry, Vol. 79, No. 4, 453-480. Igor Ryabov The academic achievement of immigrant children has been a focus of social research for decades. Yet little attention has been paid to peer social capital and its importance as a school context factor for the academic success of immigrant youths...
Changing Lives, Resistant Institutions: A New Generation Negotiates Gender, Work, and Family Change
Sociological Inquiry, Vol. 79, No. 4, 735-753. Kathleen Gerson Sociology's enduring concern with explaining the links between individual and social change has never been more relevant. We are poised at a moment when changing lives are colliding with resistant institutions. These tensions have...
The Mafioso Case: Autonomy and Self-respect
Ethical Theory and Practice, Vol. 12, No. 5, 477-493. Carla Bagnoli This article argues that immoralists do not fully enjoy autonomous agency because they are not capable of engaging in the proper form of practical reflection, which requires relating to others as having equal standing. An adequate diagnosis...
Responsibility and the Brain Sciences
Ethical Theory and Practice, Vol. 12, No. 5, 511-524. Felipe De Brigard, Eric Mandelbaum, David Ripley Some theorists think that the more we get to know about the neural underpinnings of our behaviors, the less likely we will be to hold people responsible for their actions. This intuition has driven some...
Sit Back and Enjoy The Ride: Financial planners and the symbolic domination of clients.
Canadian Journal of Sociology, Vol. 34, No. 4, 1065-1086. Patrick F. Parnaby Borrowing from Bourdieu’s theory of practice, specifically, the relationship between forms of capital and discourse on the one hand and the nature of symbolic domination on the other (see Bourdieu 1998; 1991), this paper seeks to answer...
Free time as a necessary condition of free life
Contemporary Political Theory, Vol. 8, No. 4, pg. 373-393. Jeff Noonan Human life is finite. Given that lifetime is necessarily limited, the experience of time in any given society is a central ethical problem. If all or most of human lifetime is consumed by routine tasks (or resting for the resumption of routine...
The Self-Organization of Explicit Attitudes.
Psychological Science, Vol. 20, No. 11, pg.1428-1435. Michael T. Wojnowicz, Melissa J. Ferguson, Rick Dale, Michael J. Spivey How do minds produce explicit attitudes over several hundred milliseconds? Speeded evaluative measures have revealed implicit biases beyond cognitive control and subjective awareness...
Taken on Faith? The Impact of Uncertainty, Knowledge Relatedness, and Richness of Information on Entrepreneurial Opportunity Exploitation
Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Vol. 16, No. 2, pg. 117-130. Matthew S. Wood, J. Michael Pearson This article develops a theoretical model that suggests that differential levels of uncertainty, knowledge relatedness, and richness of information will have a substantial impact on the decision to engage in entrepreneurship...
The Institutional Production of National Science in the 20th Century
International Sociology, Vol. 24, No. 6, pg. 833-869. Emilio J. Castillo Science and scientific production have been widely promoted as powerful tools for advancing national economic and social development. While much progress has been made in determining whether this is the case, less understood are the...
Self-Affirmation Enhances Attentional Bias Toward Threatening Components of a Persuasive Message
Psychological Science, Vol. 20, No. 12, Pages 1463-1467. William M.P. Klein and Peter R. Harris We explored whether self-affirmation enhances attentional bias toward threatening elements of a persuasive message. Female alcohol consumers read an article linking alcohol to *** cancer and were then exposed supraliminally...
You are who remembers you. Detecting leadership through accuracy of recall
Social Networks, Vol. 31, No. 4, pg. 255-261. Francesca Grippa and Peter A. Gloor We measured interpersonal perception accuracy by focusing on the relationship between actors’ centrality and their ability to accurately report their social interactions. We used the network measures of actors’ betweenness...
Opening the black box of link formation: Social factors underlying the structure of the web
Social Networks, Vol. 31, No. 4, pg. 271-280. Sondra Gonzalez-Bailon Links play a twofold role on the web: they open the channels through which users access information, and they determine the centrality of sites and their visibility. This paper adds two factors to the analysis of links that aim...
Saving the world one patient at a time: Psychoanalysis and social critique
Psychotherapy and Politics International, Vol. 7, No. 3, Pg. 190-205. Jennifer Tolleson In contrast to its revolutionary beginnings, the psychoanalytic discourse has abandoned its potential as a critical, dissident force in contemporary life. It is imperative, in our efforts to engage in socially responsible clinical practice...
Christian Women in IPV Relationships: An Exploratory Study of Religious Factors.
Journal of Psychology & Christianity, Vol. 28, No. 3, pg, 224-235. Mei-Chuan Wang, Sharon G. Horne, Heidi M. Levitt, Lisa M. Klesges The study examined Christian women's religious beliefs and practices in relationship to their intimate partner violence (IPV) relationships. The religious variables included religious...
Social and semantic coevolution in knowledge networks
DOI:10.1016/j.socnet.2009.04.005. Camille Roth, Jean-Philippe Cointet Socio-semantic networks involve agents creating and processing information: communities of scientists, software developers, wiki contributors and webloggers are, among others, examples of such knowledge networks. We...
Are complex decisions better left to the unconscious? Further failed replications of the deliberation-without-attention effect
Judgment and Decision Making, Vol. 4, No. 6, pg. 509–517. Dustin P. Calvillo and Alan Penaloza The deliberation-without-attention effect occurs when better decisions are made when people experience a period of distraction before a decision than when they make decisions immediately or when they spend time reflecting...
Predicting Soccer Matches After Unconscious and Conscious Thought as a Function of Expertise
Psychological Science, Vol. 20, No. 11, Pg. 1381-1387. Ap Dijksterhuis , Maarten W. Bos , Andries van der Leij , and Rick B. van Baaren In two experiments, we investigated the effects of expertise and mode of thought on the accuracy of people's predictions. Both experts and nonexperts predicted the results...
Decisions Under Distress: Stress Profiles Influence Anchoring and Adjustment
Psychological Science, Volume 20, No. 11, Pages 1394 - 1399. Karim S. Kassam , Katrina Koslov , Wendy Berry Mendes People frequently make decisions under stress. Understanding how stress affects decision making is complicated by the fact that not all stress responses are created equal. Challenge states, for example...
Varieties of (Scientific) Creativity: A Hierarchical Model of Domain-Specific Disposition, Development, and Achievement
Perspectives on Psychological Science, Volume 4, No. 5, Pages 441 - 452. Dean Keith Simonton Prior research supports the inference that scientific disciplines can be ordered into a hierarchy ranging from the "hard" natural sciences to the "soft" social sciences. This ordering corresponds with such objective...
What Do ‘We’ Know That ‘They’ Don’t? Sociologists’ versus Non-Sociologists’ Knowledge
Canadian Journal of Sociology, Vol. 34, No. 3, 671-695. Anne Mesny This paper attempts to clarify or to reposition some of the controversies generated by Burawoy’s defense of public sociology and by his vision of the mutually stimulating relationship between the different forms of sociology. Before arguing...
The Unconscious Eye Opener: Pupil Dilation Reveals Strategic Recruitment of Resources Upon Presentation of Subliminal Reward Cues
Psychological Science, Vol. 20, No. 11, Pg. 1313-1315. Erik Bijleveld, Ruud Custers, and Henk Aarts No abstract available. Read the article .
The desirability bias in predictions: Going optimistic without leaving realism
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, DOI:10.1016/j.obhdp.2009.08.003. Paul D. Windschitl, Andrew R. Smith, Jason P. Rose and Zlatan Krizan Does desire for an outcome inflate optimism? Previous experiments have produced mixed results regarding the desirability bias , with the bulk of supportive findings coming from one paradigm...
Bringing Meaning to Numbers: The Impact of Evaluative Categories on Decisions
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Vol. 15, No. 3, pg. 213-227. Ellen Peters, Nathan F. Dieckmann, Daniel Västfjäll, C. K. Mertz, Paul Slovic, Judith H. Hibbard Decision makers are often quite poor at using numeric information in decisions. The results of 4 experiments demonstrate that a manipulation of evaluative...
Neural Correlates of Value, Risk, and Risk Aversion Contributing to Decision Making under Risk
DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2614-09.2009. George I. Christopoulos, Philippe N. Tobler, Peter Bossaerts, Raymond J. Dolan, and Wolfram Schultz Decision making under risk is central to human behavior. Economic decision theory suggests that value, risk, and risk aversion influence choice behavior...
Feeling Validated Versus Being Correct: A Meta-Analysis of Selective Exposure to Information
Psychological Bulletin, 135, pg. 555-588. William Hart, Dolores Albarracín, Alice H. Eagly, Inge Brechan, Matthew J. Lindberg, Lisa Merrill A meta-analysis assessed whether exposure to information is guided by defense or accuracy motives. The studies examined information preferences in relation...
Medial cortex activity, self-reflection and depression
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Vol. 4, No. 4, pg. 313-327. Marcia K. Johnson , Susan Nolen-Hoeksema , Karen J. Mitchell and Yael Levin Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural activity associated with self-reflection in depressed [current major depressive episode (MDE)] and healthy...
Proactivity Directed Toward the Team and Organization: The Role of Leadership, Commitment and Role-breadth Self-efficacy
British Journal of Management, Vol. 20, No. 3, Pg. 279 - 291. Karoline Strauss , Mark A. Griffin and Alannah E. Rafferty Employees' proactive behaviour is increasingly important for organizations seeking to adapt in uncertain economic environments. This study examined the link between leadership and proactive...
Genetic contributions of the serotonin transporter to social learning of fear and economic decision making
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Vol. 4, No. 3, pg. 399-408. Liviu G. Cri an, Simona Pan , Romana Vulturar, Renata M. Heilman, Raluca Szekely,Bogdan Drug and Andrei C. Miu Serotonin (5-HT) modulates emotional and cognitive functions such as fear conditioning (FC) and decision making. This study investigated the...
Serotonin shapes risky decision making in monkeys
# Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, Vol. 4, No. 4, pg. 346-356. Arwen B. Long, Cynthia M. Kuhn and Michael L. Platt Some people love taking risks, while others avoid gambles at all costs. The neural mechanisms underlying individual variation in preference for risky or certain outcomes, however, remain poorly understood...
Join the Network    
Users are able to post wisdom-related news & publications, maintain a profile, and participate in discussion forums.

Institution

University of Chicago

Current Position

undergrad student

Highest Degree

Research Interests


Institution Home Page