Tag Search Results: neuroscience
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  • Why Music Makes Our Brain Sing

    By Robert J. Zatorre and Valorie N. Salimpoor, The New York Times Music is not tangible. You can’t eat it, drink it or mate with it. It doesn’t protect against the rain, wind or cold. It doesn’t vanquish predators or mend broken bones. And yet humans have always prized music — or well beyond prized,...
     Posted by: brendah
  • Approaching Power with Humility and Wisdom

    Understanding the impact that winning and power has on your brain and behavior by Michael Hogan, Psychology Today Excerpt: Most of us know of the genius of Pablo Picasso, the Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, and ceramicist who revolutionized art in the opening decades of the 20th century. But few...
     Posted by: brendah
  • Socratic Irony and Neuroscience

    Insights Into One of Our Most Important But Least Understood Philosophers By William Hirstein, Ph.D. in Mindmelding, Psychology Today The philosopher Socrates lived from 469 to 399 B.C. Although he is one of history’s most famous philosophers—arguably the most famous—he never wrote a word, unless we...
     Posted by: brendah
  • Brain to Brain: Turning Neuroscience Into Wisdom

    May 17, 2013 By Jonathan Appel Our brains, emotions, feelings, nervous systems are all one piece, or rather a series of extremely complex pieces of interlinking processes. These processes build naturally one upon the other, following evolution -- while expressing our social nature. This social nature...
     Posted by: brendah
  • Turns Out Empathy is Contagious

    By Liza Finlay, The Huffington Post, HuffPost Impact Is empathy contagious? Turns out it is. That may be hard to believe. Especially at this time of year, when frantic shoppers cut lines to snag deals and even the good folk at the Salvation Army fall prey to thieving employees. But, in fact, empathy...
     Posted by: brendah
  • The Wisdom of Five Empathy Experts at TED

    From Iraq to oxytocin, a round-up of big thoughts from big empathy experts. By Ada Calhoun 1. Sociologist Sam Richards asks if it’s possible to understand the motivations of an Iraqi insurgent? He wonders: Can anyone truly understand and empathize with another? 2. Buddhist roshi Joan Halifax explains...
     Posted by: brendah
  • Consciousness: The Great Illusion?

    By Alison Gopnik, the New York Times An excerpt: Humphrey, an emeritus professor of psychology at the London School of Economics, may not have solved the mind-body problem, and there is something to be said for the awkward geekery of philosophical analysis and experimental data. But he has some really...
     Posted by: Anna Gomberg
  • The Limits of Intelligence

    By Douglas Fox, Scientific American An excerpt: ... One might think, for example, that evolutionary processes could increase the number of neurons in our brain or boost the rate at which those neurons exchange information and that such changes would make us smarter. But several recent trends of investigation...
     Posted by: Anna Gomberg
  • Brain Calisthenics for Abstract Ideas

    By Benedict Carey, The New York Times Like any other high school junior, Wynn Haimer has a few holes in his academic game. Graphs and equations, for instance: He gets the idea, fine — one is a linear representation of the other — but making those conversions is often a headache. Or at least it was. For...
     Posted by: Anna Gomberg
  • Can the Brain Explain Your Mind?

    By Colin McGinn, The New York Review of Books 3/24/2011 Excerpt: Is studying the brain a good way to understand the mind? Does psychology stand to brain anatomy as physiology stands to body anatomy? In the case of the body, physiological functions—walking, breathing, digesting, reproducing, and so on...
     Posted by: Anna Gomberg
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